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  • Update Terms and Conditions - 2020-02-17

  • We have updated our terms and conditions (effective date: March 20th, 2020). The updated terms and conditions underline that warranty and liability are generally excluded for all our offerings, including our website, reviews and reports.
  • Update Privacy Policy - 2020-01-15

  • We have updated our privacy policy (effective date: March 1st, 2020). We commit to not using user search and machine learning data to improve our services unless if users opt-in to be part of our anonymized focus group during registration or in the Dashboard.
  • Battery Technology Show USA (April 21-23, 2020, Detroit MI, USA) - 2019-12-19

  • Join us in Detroit for the Battery Technology Show USA, which will be focused on future battery & EV technologies.
  • Outline for our presentation:
  • Solid-state batteries - key technology approaches & time-to-market
  • Attendees will learn which solid-state batteries have been launched already into niche markets, and which technology barriers for now prevent employment in mass EV applications. Risks & opportunities identified in IP portfolios by large battery & automotive manufacturers and key startups will be compared with go-to-market & technology readiness statements. Finally, we will highlight examples of high energy cathodes & anodes that are being evaluated in combination with solid electrolytes.
  • The Battery Show Europe (April 28-30, 2020, Stuttgart, Germany) - 2019-12-11

  • Join us in Stuttgart for the largest Battery Show in Europe! We are looking forward to join the panel discussion:
  • Beyond lithium-ion panel debate: solid-state battery feasibility: when & how will we get there?
  • International Battery Seminar & Exhibit (March 30-April 2, 2020, Orlando FL, USA) - 2019-12-10

  • Join us in Florida in 2020 where a packed program awaits you! We are looking forward to host the breakout discussion table:
  • Solid-state batteries - key technology approaches & time-to-market
    • time-to-market in electronics, medical devices & EVs, is safety or energy density the driving force?
    • advantages & disadvantages of solid electrolytes: oxides, sulfides, phosphates, polymers, combinations
    • power performance in EVs: do solid-state batteries provide sufficient power? Will they be combined with supercapacitors?
  • Battery Technology Show on October 22-23, 2019 in Coventry (UK) - 2019-10-29

  • Battery Technology Show

  • The Battery Technology Show covered a very nice mix of contributions on market forecasts along the supply chain along with technology outlooks, which were condensed into application requirements for niche and mass markets. It was very easy to get in touch with speakers and a variety of subject matter experts.
  • The presentation by ilika illustrated how solid-state microbatteries can already provide high added value in the area of IoT devices and medical implants. Co-funded by the Faraday institution, the Goliath program has been started by a consortium that consists of an OEM, ilika, a battery cell producer and a major academic institution. Automotive solid-state batteries with a pouch, stacked cell design will be developed. A bipolar cell architecture is also being considered as an option.
  • ZapGo presented on several collaborations in the area of supercapacitors, including with Oxford University (UK) from where patents have been licensed, with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA), in the area of grid storage with a partner in Norway, and in the area of ferries. A novel concept they pursue is the design of supercapacitors in the form of three-dimensional car parts for very tight integration, volume and weight savings (e.g. design of fenders with supercapacitor function).
  • The speaker from Airbus pointed out how very substantial battery improvements are still necessary for aerospace applications even while many electric aircraft development activities are already taking place. These battery improvements are very challenging because energy, power and safety simultaneously have to be improved beyond the state-of-the-art. Cells with >800 Wh/kg energy density are demanded to achieve a reach of >1,100 km with small all-electric aircrafts. Cost targets are likely relaxed as compared to the automotive sector. As a consequence, commercialization activities for new battery technologies in aerospace applications can be focused on first reaching performance targets at moderate production scales, based processes that are not yet fully optimized.
  • The presentation by Benchmark Minerals projected that the European Union will become the 2nd largest geographical hub behind China in terms of Li-ion battery cell production, albeit at 4-5 times smaller scale as compared to China.
  • In a conversation about fuel cells moderated by the Cleantech Group, representatives from ULEMco and Connect emphasized that batteries and fuel cells will likely evolve in a complementary, non-competitive fashion, with fuel cells principally having favorable chances in the B2B sector where low downtime and backup power are required (e.g. ambulances, trains, trucks), while Li-ion batteries have an early lead in the B2C sector that will be hard to overcome for fuel cells because of the limited number of hydrogen charging stations.
  • Our talk on 'Next Generation Batteries - Solid-State & Silicon Anodes' was received with interest from OEM, startup, government funding and academic entities because we were able to identify key patent portfolios by companies that do not much publicize their battery R&D efforts (for example Medtronic in solid-state batteries). Key insights extracted from very large patent portfolios (e.g. by Toyota) were also appreciated, especially the discussion of advantages and disadvantages of different electrolytes (e.g. sulfides vs. garnet oxides vs. phosphates) and electrode materials (e.g. state-of-the art NMC vs. novel diphosphates).
  • Battery Japan Recap - 2019-03-07

  • The conference adjacent to Battery Japan in Tokyo once again provided excellent insights into ongoing R&D activities and market developments, thanks to simultaneous translations from Japanese to English.
  • Mr. Hideo Takeshita from B3 Corp. explained how market growth for Li-ion batteries continues in mobile/IT and xEV applications, while the ESS (stationary energy storage systems) market is growing as well, albeit from a smaller base. Li-ion batteries are starting to encroach on lead-acid batteries in automotive SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) and UPS (uninterruptible power supply) battery applications.
  • Both Mr. Takeshita and Mr. Yosikazu Watanabe from Tukushi Shigen Consul (TSC) do not believe lithium & cobalt supply will pose an insurmountable supply risk as the Li-ion battery industry grows further, because there are many new mining projects that will lead to increased lithium supply, and because cobalt content in cathode materials has already dropped to 5% for NCA (nickel-cobalt-aluminum) and to 15% for NCM (nickel-cobalt-manganese) materials.
  • A further highlight was the presentation by Dr. Shinji Nakanishi from the Advanced Material Engineering Division of Toyota, who illustrated how they modify interfaces in solid-state batteries with the help of advanced surface treatment processes. These processes can be applied to materials in bulk powder form rather than at device level. This leads to high process throughput at large scale and manageable costs. Solid electrolyte particles are deposited using a liquid coating process in the presence of a binder, which again, as a rule is more efficient and robust than powder compression & sintering in devices.
  • Toyota expects a higher energy density for solid-state batteries, but a low power density as compared to Li-ion batteries based on liquid electrolytes. Although high power densities are achievable with solid-state batteries, there are likely negative effects on longevity upon applying high currents (crack formation). The presentation by Toyota together with the targeted acquisition of Maxwell Technologies by Tesla supports our prediction from 2018 that supercapacitors will be combined with solid-state batteries in automotive and ESS systems.
  • Battery Technology Show in London - 2018-11-13

  • Louis Brasington from the Cleantech Group has written an excellent recap of the roundtable discussion we joined at the Battery Technology Show in London. Promising technologies and startup companies are highlighted.
  • seif Impact Academy - 2018-03-23

  • During the next five months, we will participate in the Zurich-based seif Impact Academy, which supports impact enterprises during the growth phase. Our coach is an IT security executive from the Swiss financial services industry.
  • Making Technology Less Manipulative - 2018-03-09

  • In this thought-provoking Stanford Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders presentation, Tristan Harris (Time Well Spent) explains how Internet businesses that finance themselves through advertising employ machine learning techniques to attract users to spend as much time as possible on their site.
  • According to Tristan, if a user pays for a service on the Internet, the interests between the user and the service provider are better aligned towards solving a problem within the shortest time possible.
  • As it is our purpose to facilitate energy storage research, our target is that users spend as little time as necessary on our site to increase innovation productivity. Consequently, it is our intention to finance ourselves through user contributions rather than through advertising.
  • Commercialization of Battery Materials - 2017-11-12

  • A recently published article by Prof. Vinayak Dravid from Northwestern University and coworkers very nicely illustrates the challenges of converting battery-related inventions demonstrated at the R&D bench level to real life applications. A systematic framework is proposed based on observations from the pharmaceutical industry. Because battery performance is typically limited by interface effects, it is important to emphasize that the more different material combinations are tested at each successive technology readiness level, the higher the likelihood that a battery material will be incorporated into a real life system.